From Hot Dogs to Breaking the 9-5 Mould

From selling hot dogs, to starting an online liquor store, to founding one of America's fastest growing media companies. 

Sam Parr has worked his way up to become America's king of content. How did he do it?

 
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Being fired is not always a bad thing, right..?

After high school, the next "rational" step was to get a job, but...

"I used to be a smart ass, so everyone would fire me. Now I’m still kind of a smart ass but I’m not mean."
- Sam

After getting fired from over 6 to 7 jobs, he decided that he wanted to start a business. A profitable one that had to do with the Internet, because he knew that was where the smart money was. After some serious Googling, he found out that San Francisco was the place to live. 

And so he went on his way.

Even though he got hired at Airbnb, Sam never showed up. Instead, he started a company called "Bunk" with his friend - John Havel. Shortly enough, the business got acquired by Apartment List, which led to Sam saying "I quit because I wanna start something else".

Because he was lacking inspiration on creating the next best thing, he wanted to listen to a bunch of creative geniuses talk, but was immediately put off by the cost of a TED talk.

He wanted to make a conference bada*s, and not cost $10,000 per ticket.

Introducing HustleCon, that aims to empower the non-techies with startup tactics.

He read every book on copy writing, so that he could "learn to use words to convince people to do things". 

He leveraged on existing email addresses to market the sh*t out of the "last-minute" conference.

 

 
 And then this happened.

And then this happened.

 

In 7 weeks, (that's like, less than two months) he hosted the 400 people conference with 15 top speakers. 

And it became very profitable.

(P.S. Register now to attend Hustle Con 2018 on June 22 in Oakland CA. It's the perfect summer getaway.)

"You gotta have balls of steel to run a profitable event... While I don't have steel balls, I have gotten used to the pressure." 

As Steve Jobs said, real artists ship. "You gotta have balls of steel to run a profitable event... While I don't have steel balls, I have gotten used to the pressure."  

After the mayhem of organizing a huge conference, he took a trip across America for sixty days to discover what America has to offer beyond business and innovation. For many, vacations have always been directly correlated to happiness. But Sam realized that all he wanted to do was be competitive.

 
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"I wanted to work my ass off. I don't want to just chill". - Sam

After his well-deserved vacay, Sam realized that people loved his promotional content for Hustle Con just as much as the conference itself. And that's how The Hustle, America's fastest growing media company, was born.

The email newsletter sends out a daily email for millennials - talking about the important business and tech news, without political jargon. 

 
 

Soon enough, he was able to grow his email list from 0 to 100,000 people in less than a year. 

Not only that, but twelve companies that spoke at the conference (including General Assembly, Amazon, and Nerd Wallet) invested half a million dollars to show their support for the Hustle. 

"We’re going to be the brand that 20-something wanna-be entrepreneurs say 'I’m going to take down The Hustle' when they’re trying to raise money for their idea." - Sam

And Sam's not afraid to tell you how he did it. 

He's an active writer on The Hustle despite his busy lifestyle, and spills valuable insights as much as he can. Like this article about why Steve Jobs was an a-hole.

Last year, Hustle Con got big names like Casey Neistat and Miguel McKelvey. And the Hustle's only getting bigger.

This year, the service-oriented media brand is not just with more ticketed events, but is gearing towards being a software and product recommendation service.

LAST BUT NOT NOT NOT LEAST...

"If you’re reading this (a blog about starting companies), you most likely cross the intelligence threshold of having what it takes. So, when you see someone big, think that you and them are the same and use that to push away any fear." - Sam Parr on his Launch Summit Interview.

Meet the king of content, and get that one-to-one chat with him. (Yep, he's mentoring at Legacy this year.)

Hustle Con 2018 is happening on June 22, 2018.

How We Got Steli Efti to Speak

 
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"You're either building sh*t, or selling sh*t. Everything else is wasteful."

When you think of Steli Efti, you'll think The Sales God.

He's helped more than 200 venture-backed startups to build and scale their sales processes. He's also closed thousands of deals worth tens of millions of dollars.

HOW TO GET A FIRE SPEAKER LINEUP 2.0.

Getting speakers is a tricky one, especially when we are student-run and completely non-profit.

Last year we gave you a rundown on how we got Brian Wong to speak at The Legacy Conference 2017. 

This year, we're going to tell you how we got the top sales icon of Silicon Valley to speak. 

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If you don't know who Steli Efti is, here's a summary on why you should:

 

(Watch from 2:45 to 4:30)

 

With him speaking at top conferences like Pioneers Festival and Tedx, we knew he was going to be a tough cookie to get. 

But we decided to try anyway. 

THE COLD REACH OUT

"When you show up, magic f*king happens."

And "showing up" means taking that comfortable first step - sending that first email, making that first call, going to a conference like Legacy.

So we drafted an email, and "showed up" in his inbox. 

 
 

But we knew it wasn't enough.

Steli Efti is all about the "power of follow-ups".

So he said: "I am not always their number one priority, so I will follow up until that person has a chance to respond.

And so we did

After the third follow up, he finally responded:

 
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It wasn't an immediate yes, but we knew that we had to "always, always, always follow up". 

The CEO in his talk at PODIM Conference 2016 mentioned that "the beauty is that most humans - they show up once and they go silent. They never ever follow up or follow through."

 

So here's to you, hustler. For following up and following through. Join the community of like-minded doers.

Learn how to Close.io with Steli on March 24th, 2018.

the cookie cutter path

 
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Kloe Desrosiers, former uOttawa student, now leading marketing at Humi.

So… What’s your story?

I was a huge believer in following the cookie cutter path. I graduated high school as valedictorian, and was expecting to spend 4+ years in university to get the job I wanted.

After two years of university, I realized that things just aren’t as cookie cutter as they used to be. Years ago, people would have to get a degree to be hired at a good company, but I wanted to see if my experience that I gained throughout the two years was enough to further apply my knowledge.

So I started applying to jobs. I thought “I lose nothing by applying”. I lose nothing by testing the waters.

In August, I was offered an internship position at Humi, and I took it. I thought again: I lose nothing by taking this offer. If it doesn’t work out, I go back to school in four months.

It ended up working out really well. They offered me a full-time role, and I loved the personal growth I was gaining, so it was a no brainer to continue challenging myself.

I think I’ll end up continuing education part-time, but on my own wallet, and for a program that is practical and aligns with my career goals.

 
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“Testing the waters” … That takes lots of courage. Were you ever scared?

Oh yeah. When I first moved to Toronto, I started a new job, didn’t have a home for the first month, and didn’t know many people in the city.

But after a rough couple of months, I realized that if I kept being scared and doubting myself in this position, I’m not going to give it my all.

There are still times where I still doubt myself, but I think that’s normal. I realize that it is because I’m doing something that not many people have done before, which scares me because all I see is the thousands of people my age in school right now. It’s inevitable to think that I might be doing something wrong.

What would you tell your 2017 self?

Make a list of things that are most important to you and your personal growth, and work backwards and create ways to complete those things. It sounds simple in theory, but hard to apply in everyday life.  The things you do every day should align with what’s important to you.

 
 

If you had one thing to tell the attendees that will be attending the Legacy Conference 2018, what would it be?

For anything you do, think critically and objectively with the information you have, and make a decision that’s best for you. It’s just not so cookie cutter anymore. We’re all uncomfortable doing something different than everyone else, but we are all different so it just makes sense.

Analyze your situation. For me, I didn’t want to be in 40K+ debt without practical experience, in a field where I didn’t need need a degree right away, and I had  just enough experience to get a job.

But hey, Legacy attendee, this most likely isn’t your situation. We’re all in different situations with different goals in mind. So take the canvas and paint your career (and life) the way you want it.

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Meet like-minded attendees like Kloe on March 23 - 24, 2018, at the Legacy Conference 2018. 

Get your tickets at https://bruha.com/event/2651#buytickets

5 hustlers you need to know about

When asked to name the first entrepreneur that comes to your mind, who would you think of?

Mark Zuckerberg? Elon Musk? Casey Neistat? Steve Jobs?

To know is to learn, and that's what the following five people I'm about to talk about are people that you should probably look up in your spare time. These hustlers are the hidden gems, the un-talked-about. But all of them have a bada*s attitude that we should all take notes from.

 

 
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1. Steli Efti (LA's Zeus 2.0)

When there's Steli, there's sales.

Being the Greek god of closing sales, that title didn't come easy. Like every one of us, Steli had dreams. So he bought a one-way ticket to the valley of dreams, and worked on building a sexy tech startup...

Which flopped.

It was a sales business for venture-backed startups in the Silicon Valley. Despite doing B2B sales for over 200 companies, he found that there wasn't a reliable sales software to efficiently close sales. So, like any innovator would, he built his own (with the help of his team, of course).

Next thing you know, sales representatives and clients were knocking on his door, trying to buy his sales software. And Close.io was founded.

Steli Efti, from taking two whole years to raise $100,000, now raises over $1.5 million in a few weeks. His determination and grit ultimately crowned him as the king of hustle in the Silicon Valley.

Learn more from his sweet victory at: http://blog.close.io/author/steli-efti

 

 
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2. Tim Urban (the master procrastinator)

Tim is one of the Internet's most popular bloggers out there. And we know "popular" can be a vague term, so let's break it down:

His famous blog, Wait but Why, has over millions of unique page views, famous fans like Elon Musk, Evan Williams and Chris Anderson to name a few, and is filled with low grade comic figures.

Oh and his TED talk has generated over 20 million views. No big deal.

But that didn't come without some good ole' hard work. Before launching Wait but Why, Tim wrote over 600 blog articles over the span of six years.

In order to find out what works, there has to be something that doesn't. And Tim is the proven success of it all.

Tim's view on why maximizing your time is important: https://waitbutwhy.com/2016/10/100-blocks-day.html

 

 
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3. Candice Pool Neistat (just-do-it-er)

She's more than just Casey Neistat's wife. The self-proclaimed "tomboy" is a fashion icon. One of her newest ventures, Billy!, has seen immediate success with over 120K Instagram followers and a wide product lineup.

With two successful businesses as a benchmark for her success, she managed to meet a variety of fashion needs.

Candice had always been driven by an entrepreneurial spirit. From selling lemonades in prime jogging locations when she was a child, to using leather to make cuffs (which she then sold to Patricia Fields, stylist for Sex and the City), she was always a firm believer in just doing it.

"If there isn't a straight line to get somewhere, use a curvy line instead", Candice says in an interview with Resource Magazine. With her badass attitude and desire to never stop learning, she's embodied what being a boss truly means.

Check out Finn and Billy! at: https://www.finnjewelry.com/ and https://www.lovebilly.com/

 

 
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4. John Zimmer (the nicest guy, like ever.)

If there's one very important that every one has to learn from John, it would be humility. The Lyft co-founder has made it clear that bashing competition to get ahead such as Uber is by no means a way to win.

Graduating Cornell University with a Bachelor's Degree in Hotel Administration, John worked as an analyst at Lehman Brothers. But he wanted to do more. He wanted to challenge major cities' infrastructures. In wanting to build a safe and friendly environment to commute (with its initial intention focused around the safety of women), Lyft was founded.

Whether Lyft is Uber's direct competition or not, one thing's for sure: John just wants to make a positive impact in the world through entrepreneurship.

Now you must be wondering, why the hell would he work as an analyst if he wanted to be an entrepreneur? By working for the Lehman Brothers, John got the financial background that he needed to kick off the business.

In always challenging the status quo, John has emerged as one of the most humble leaders of today.

John spilling the deets on "how he did it" at https://www.acast.com/howididit

 

 
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5. Seth Godin (it's Seth mothaf*ckin Godin)

The wizard of the 21st Century.

The legendary Seth Godin is the author of 18 bestseller books (think Linchpin, Tribes and Purple Cow) and a world-class speaker. His TED talk has generated over 6 million views, and is the founder of Yoyodine and Squidoo before focusing on his writing, speaking and blogging.

He's a firm believer in dancing with resistance, thus documenting his ideas and in turn, revolutionize marketing. He's the brainchild behind Permission Marketing, and shifting product-based marketing efforts to relation-based marketing.

By challenging the status quo (the education system included), his creative genius has spawned from being a mere thought to an actual dialogue.

Seth's all about getting stuff out there, and not being afraid of the flinch.

Be amazed at his GODinLY words: http://www.sethgodin.com/sg/

How are you f*cking the flinch today?